May 30, 2019

Eco Action Day Roundtable 2019 | Recycling: The road to zero waste?

Ricoh Printing Innovation Centre

103 Penang Road, VisionCrest Commercial
Level 7, Singapore 238467

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The 3Rs known as “Reduce, reuse, recycle” is the cornerstone of environmentalism, but the value of recycling has come under intense scrutiny in recent years.

China’s ban on waste imports revealed a broken global waste management system and the unsustainable practices of developed countries shipping their waste to developing ones for disposal. Countries are grappling with how to deal with growing waste generation and providing the right infrastructure to manage and dispose this waste, even as climate change and resource scarcity accelerate.

Recent reports state that only 9 per cent of all plastic ever produced has been recycled, with much ending up in the ocean. Singapore’s own domestic recycling rate remains flat at 21 per cent.

But this is set to the change—Singapore this year announced a new Resource Sustainability Bill and Zero Waste Masterplan to raise overall recycling rates to 70 per cent and domestic recycling to 30 per cent by 2030.

In Singapore’s Year Towards Zero Waste, there has never been a better time to relook and reimagine how we handle waste, and ask critical questions about the future of recycling:

• Recycling consumes energy and resources; repurposed material seldom retains the same quality as virgin material—what are some innovative solutions today that will define our future?
• Will a policy of extended producer responsibility fill the gaps when it comes to material innovation, design for recovery, and collection?
• What are viable alternatives for decentralised and localised waste recycling, and how can this be implemented within Singapore and in countries around the region which are struggling to take on the world’s waste problems?

This year’s Eco Action Day Roundtable will gather experts in manufacturing, waste management and civic society to deep dive into an issue that is coming to define our time, and to come up with concrete solutions and actions to advance SustainableDevelopment Goal 13, climate action.

Eco Action Day is Singapore’s largest and longest-running business-led environmental initiative held in celebration of the United Nations Environment Programme’s World Environment Day every year by Ricoh Asia Pacific. It is observed by calling on organisations and individuals to pledge positive action for the environment in Singapore.

This event is by invite-only with a passcode. If you are interested to join, please contact Christina at events@eco-business.com.

Guest of Honour

Tan Meng Dui

CEO, National Environment Agency (NEA)

Judges and speakers

Tan Meng Dui

CEO, National Environment Agency (NEA)

Anirban Mukherjee

Director Global Packaging – Asia Pacific, Johnson & Johnson consumer

Mohit Grover

Executive Director, Deloitte Singapore

J.D. Kasamoto

General Manager, Service & Environment Division, Ricoh Asia Pacific

Pek Hai Lin

Manager, Zero Waste SG

Tan Szue Hann

Managing Director, Miniwiz

Jessica Cheam

Managing Editor, Eco-Business

Hosts and moderators

Robin Hicks

Deputy Editor, Eco-Business

Agenda

9:00 am

Guest registration

Five groups discuss challenges, ideas and opportunities in Buildings, Energy, Water, Waste and Food. Five facilitators will then return to the final plenary to share and exchange ideas.​

RT1: Buildings  

More homes, commercial and industrial facilities need to be built amid resource constraints, rising temperatures and sea levels. Can Singapore do it without extracting more virgin resources? What are the most forward-thinking developers and building owners doing to implement circular economy principles in the building sector?

What role can policymakers and the finance industry play in circular infrastructure development?

RT 2: Energy 

What does circularity in the energy sector mean for Singapore, which relies on natural gas for 95 per cent of its electricity needs? How can industry become more energy efficient? To what extent can Singapore's energy be supplied by solar and other renewables? Where are the biggest business opportunities?

RT 3: Water 

Singapore prides itself on the ability to close its water loop, even as the world lurches towards a water crisis. What are the opportunities that companies here can exploit in the region?  How can industry become more water efficient? What are the technologies will drive greater efficiency in desalination?  What is the next frontier?

RT 4: Waste 

Waste represents a huge untapped resource inSingapore and in many Asian countries, which have started pushing back against being a dumping ground for developed nations’ trash. What is the economic potential of tapping into these waste streams? What can Singapore do about the fact that more than 80 per cent of its plastic, textile and e-waste end up in the incinerator and landfill? What are the policies required to enable circular resource management?

RT 5: Food 

Singapore wasted  763,100 tonnes of food in 2018, recycling only 17 per cent of it.  How can food waste be reduced at each step of the supply chain? Cities must shore up their food security amid  changing weather patterns and supply disruptions. What are the circular  opportunities that Singapore's fledgling high-tech farming sector can  exploit? 

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9:30 am

Welcome remarks

Yuji Hiruma, Director & Senior General Manager of Digital Workplace Marketing Division in Ricoh Asia Pacific

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9:35 am

Keynote speech by Guest-of-Honour, Mr Tan Meng Dui, CEO, National Environment Agency (NEA)

Five groups discuss challenges, ideas and opportunities in Buildings, Energy, Water, Waste and Food. Five facilitators will then return to the final plenary to share and exchange ideas.​

RT1: Buildings  

More homes, commercial and industrial facilities need to be built amid resource constraints, rising temperatures and sea levels. Can Singapore do it without extracting more virgin resources? What are the most forward-thinking developers and building owners doing to implement circular economy principles in the building sector?

What role can policymakers and the finance industry play in circular infrastructure development?

RT 2: Energy 

What does circularity in the energy sector mean for Singapore, which relies on natural gas for 95 per cent of its electricity needs? How can industry become more energy efficient? To what extent can Singapore's energy be supplied by solar and other renewables? Where are the biggest business opportunities?

RT 3: Water 

Singapore prides itself on the ability to close its water loop, even as the world lurches towards a water crisis. What are the opportunities that companies here can exploit in the region?  How can industry become more water efficient? What are the technologies will drive greater efficiency in desalination?  What is the next frontier?

RT 4: Waste 

Waste represents a huge untapped resource inSingapore and in many Asian countries, which have started pushing back against being a dumping ground for developed nations’ trash. What is the economic potential of tapping into these waste streams? What can Singapore do about the fact that more than 80 per cent of its plastic, textile and e-waste end up in the incinerator and landfill? What are the policies required to enable circular resource management?

RT 5: Food 

Singapore wasted  763,100 tonnes of food in 2018, recycling only 17 per cent of it.  How can food waste be reduced at each step of the supply chain? Cities must shore up their food security amid  changing weather patterns and supply disruptions. What are the circular  opportunities that Singapore's fledgling high-tech farming sector can  exploit? 

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Tan Meng Dui

CEO, National Environment Agency (NEA)

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9:45 am

Special presentation

Five groups discuss challenges, ideas and opportunities in Buildings, Energy, Water, Waste and Food. Five facilitators will then return to the final plenary to share and exchange ideas.​

RT1: Buildings  

More homes, commercial and industrial facilities need to be built amid resource constraints, rising temperatures and sea levels. Can Singapore do it without extracting more virgin resources? What are the most forward-thinking developers and building owners doing to implement circular economy principles in the building sector?

What role can policymakers and the finance industry play in circular infrastructure development?

RT 2: Energy 

What does circularity in the energy sector mean for Singapore, which relies on natural gas for 95 per cent of its electricity needs? How can industry become more energy efficient? To what extent can Singapore's energy be supplied by solar and other renewables? Where are the biggest business opportunities?

RT 3: Water 

Singapore prides itself on the ability to close its water loop, even as the world lurches towards a water crisis. What are the opportunities that companies here can exploit in the region?  How can industry become more water efficient? What are the technologies will drive greater efficiency in desalination?  What is the next frontier?

RT 4: Waste 

Waste represents a huge untapped resource inSingapore and in many Asian countries, which have started pushing back against being a dumping ground for developed nations’ trash. What is the economic potential of tapping into these waste streams? What can Singapore do about the fact that more than 80 per cent of its plastic, textile and e-waste end up in the incinerator and landfill? What are the policies required to enable circular resource management?

RT 5: Food 

Singapore wasted  763,100 tonnes of food in 2018, recycling only 17 per cent of it.  How can food waste be reduced at each step of the supply chain? Cities must shore up their food security amid  changing weather patterns and supply disruptions. What are the circular  opportunities that Singapore's fledgling high-tech farming sector can  exploit? 

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J.D. Kasamoto

General Manager, Service & Environment Division, Ricoh Asia Pacific

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9:55 am

Video screening

Mikako Suzuki, General Manager, Sustainability Management Division of Ricoh Company Limited

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10:00 am

Breakout roundtable sessions – 5 groups

Participants break into groups of 10 to discuss the topics at hand, facilitated by a pre-appointed spokesperson. Each group must agree on 3 actionable outcomes based on the topic at their table to advance sustainable waste management.

The five themes are:

• The role of manufacturers
• Social behaviour
• Effective policymaking
• Designing for a circular economy
• Business models and innovation

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11:00 am

Panel discussion – Recycling: What’s the point?

In the Year of Climate Action in 2018, Singapore’s recycling rate fell by one percentage point even as domestic recycling improved. Despite years of awareness raising efforts and incentive schemes, household recycling rates have not improved, pointing to a continued lack of understanding around the need to move away from resource-intensive modes of production and consumption. With 12 years left to ramp up climate action and avoid the worst impacts of climate change, is it time to move the conversation away from recycling? In Singapore’s Year Towards Zero Waste, is it time to look towards a new message for sustainability and environmentalism?

The moderator will invite speakers to share the 3 actionable outcomes his or her table has come up with to take concrete steps towards sustainable waste management.

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Mohit Grover

Executive Director, Deloitte Singapore

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Pek Hai Lin

Manager, Zero Waste SG

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Tan Meng Dui

CEO, National Environment Agency (NEA)

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Tan Szue Hann

Managing Director, Miniwiz

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Anirban Mukherjee

Director Global Packaging – Asia Pacific, Johnson & Johnson consumer

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Robin Hicks

Deputy Editor, Eco-Business

11:45 am

Question & Answer

Five groups discuss challenges, ideas and opportunities in Buildings, Energy, Water, Waste and Food. Five facilitators will then return to the final plenary to share and exchange ideas.​

RT1: Buildings  

More homes, commercial and industrial facilities need to be built amid resource constraints, rising temperatures and sea levels. Can Singapore do it without extracting more virgin resources? What are the most forward-thinking developers and building owners doing to implement circular economy principles in the building sector?

What role can policymakers and the finance industry play in circular infrastructure development?

RT 2: Energy 

What does circularity in the energy sector mean for Singapore, which relies on natural gas for 95 per cent of its electricity needs? How can industry become more energy efficient? To what extent can Singapore's energy be supplied by solar and other renewables? Where are the biggest business opportunities?

RT 3: Water 

Singapore prides itself on the ability to close its water loop, even as the world lurches towards a water crisis. What are the opportunities that companies here can exploit in the region?  How can industry become more water efficient? What are the technologies will drive greater efficiency in desalination?  What is the next frontier?

RT 4: Waste 

Waste represents a huge untapped resource inSingapore and in many Asian countries, which have started pushing back against being a dumping ground for developed nations’ trash. What is the economic potential of tapping into these waste streams? What can Singapore do about the fact that more than 80 per cent of its plastic, textile and e-waste end up in the incinerator and landfill? What are the policies required to enable circular resource management?

RT 5: Food 

Singapore wasted  763,100 tonnes of food in 2018, recycling only 17 per cent of it.  How can food waste be reduced at each step of the supply chain? Cities must shore up their food security amid  changing weather patterns and supply disruptions. What are the circular  opportunities that Singapore's fledgling high-tech farming sector can  exploit? 

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12:00 pm

Closing

Five groups discuss challenges, ideas and opportunities in Buildings, Energy, Water, Waste and Food. Five facilitators will then return to the final plenary to share and exchange ideas.​

RT1: Buildings  

More homes, commercial and industrial facilities need to be built amid resource constraints, rising temperatures and sea levels. Can Singapore do it without extracting more virgin resources? What are the most forward-thinking developers and building owners doing to implement circular economy principles in the building sector?

What role can policymakers and the finance industry play in circular infrastructure development?

RT 2: Energy 

What does circularity in the energy sector mean for Singapore, which relies on natural gas for 95 per cent of its electricity needs? How can industry become more energy efficient? To what extent can Singapore's energy be supplied by solar and other renewables? Where are the biggest business opportunities?

RT 3: Water 

Singapore prides itself on the ability to close its water loop, even as the world lurches towards a water crisis. What are the opportunities that companies here can exploit in the region?  How can industry become more water efficient? What are the technologies will drive greater efficiency in desalination?  What is the next frontier?

RT 4: Waste 

Waste represents a huge untapped resource inSingapore and in many Asian countries, which have started pushing back against being a dumping ground for developed nations’ trash. What is the economic potential of tapping into these waste streams? What can Singapore do about the fact that more than 80 per cent of its plastic, textile and e-waste end up in the incinerator and landfill? What are the policies required to enable circular resource management?

RT 5: Food 

Singapore wasted  763,100 tonnes of food in 2018, recycling only 17 per cent of it.  How can food waste be reduced at each step of the supply chain? Cities must shore up their food security amid  changing weather patterns and supply disruptions. What are the circular  opportunities that Singapore's fledgling high-tech farming sector can  exploit? 

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Jessica Cheam

Managing Editor, Eco-Business

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12:15 pm

Networking lunch

Five groups discuss challenges, ideas and opportunities in Buildings, Energy, Water, Waste and Food. Five facilitators will then return to the final plenary to share and exchange ideas.​

RT1: Buildings  

More homes, commercial and industrial facilities need to be built amid resource constraints, rising temperatures and sea levels. Can Singapore do it without extracting more virgin resources? What are the most forward-thinking developers and building owners doing to implement circular economy principles in the building sector?

What role can policymakers and the finance industry play in circular infrastructure development?

RT 2: Energy 

What does circularity in the energy sector mean for Singapore, which relies on natural gas for 95 per cent of its electricity needs? How can industry become more energy efficient? To what extent can Singapore's energy be supplied by solar and other renewables? Where are the biggest business opportunities?

RT 3: Water 

Singapore prides itself on the ability to close its water loop, even as the world lurches towards a water crisis. What are the opportunities that companies here can exploit in the region?  How can industry become more water efficient? What are the technologies will drive greater efficiency in desalination?  What is the next frontier?

RT 4: Waste 

Waste represents a huge untapped resource inSingapore and in many Asian countries, which have started pushing back against being a dumping ground for developed nations’ trash. What is the economic potential of tapping into these waste streams? What can Singapore do about the fact that more than 80 per cent of its plastic, textile and e-waste end up in the incinerator and landfill? What are the policies required to enable circular resource management?

RT 5: Food 

Singapore wasted  763,100 tonnes of food in 2018, recycling only 17 per cent of it.  How can food waste be reduced at each step of the supply chain? Cities must shore up their food security amid  changing weather patterns and supply disruptions. What are the circular  opportunities that Singapore's fledgling high-tech farming sector can  exploit? 

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2:00 pm

End of event

Five groups discuss challenges, ideas and opportunities in Buildings, Energy, Water, Waste and Food. Five facilitators will then return to the final plenary to share and exchange ideas.​

RT1: Buildings  

More homes, commercial and industrial facilities need to be built amid resource constraints, rising temperatures and sea levels. Can Singapore do it without extracting more virgin resources? What are the most forward-thinking developers and building owners doing to implement circular economy principles in the building sector?

What role can policymakers and the finance industry play in circular infrastructure development?

RT 2: Energy 

What does circularity in the energy sector mean for Singapore, which relies on natural gas for 95 per cent of its electricity needs? How can industry become more energy efficient? To what extent can Singapore's energy be supplied by solar and other renewables? Where are the biggest business opportunities?

RT 3: Water 

Singapore prides itself on the ability to close its water loop, even as the world lurches towards a water crisis. What are the opportunities that companies here can exploit in the region?  How can industry become more water efficient? What are the technologies will drive greater efficiency in desalination?  What is the next frontier?

RT 4: Waste 

Waste represents a huge untapped resource inSingapore and in many Asian countries, which have started pushing back against being a dumping ground for developed nations’ trash. What is the economic potential of tapping into these waste streams? What can Singapore do about the fact that more than 80 per cent of its plastic, textile and e-waste end up in the incinerator and landfill? What are the policies required to enable circular resource management?

RT 5: Food 

Singapore wasted  763,100 tonnes of food in 2018, recycling only 17 per cent of it.  How can food waste be reduced at each step of the supply chain? Cities must shore up their food security amid  changing weather patterns and supply disruptions. What are the circular  opportunities that Singapore's fledgling high-tech farming sector can  exploit? 

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Venue

Register Now

This event is by invite-only with a passcode. If you are interested to join, please contact Christina at events@eco-business.com.