May 9, 2019

CEO Roundtable: Digital disruption in the city

Four Seasons Ballroom, Four Seasons Hotel Singapore

190 Orchard Blvd,

Singapore 248646

Organisers

Organised by

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The Fourth Industrial Revolution is transforming the face of cities, and Asia is the epicentre of this global digital disruption.

Research shows that smarter cities could increase GDP per capita by as much as 21 per cent, and the strategic deployment of blockchain, artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, and now the Artificial Intelligence of Things (AIoT), can enable businesses to achieve more efficient operations, improve human-machine interactions, enhance data management and analytics and create new business opportunities.

McKinsey estimates that smart solutions could generate economic value of up to US$70 billion in mobility and US$25 billion for the built environment in Southeast Asia alone. The total number of connected IoT devices are estimated to grow from about 9 billion in 2017 to more than 55 billion by 2025, while 58 per cent of Asia Pacific enterprises are either implementing or planning to implement IoT over the next 24 months.

With the launch of the ASEAN Smart Cities Network in 2018 and the adoption of smart technology now at a tipping point, businesses that learn to navigate the digital economy will stay ahead in the 21st Century. On 9 May 2019, Eco-Business will host a CEO roundtable titled ‘Digital disruption in the city’, which will convene high-level decision makers in business, science, policy and civic society to discuss the challenges and opportunities in digitalisation and its role in advancing the UN’s Sustainable Development Goal 11 – creating sustainable cities and communities.

This exclusive event will provide illuminating conversations and an honest exchange of views among C-level business leaders on how the Fourth Industrial Revolution has created ripples across industries. The real estate, infrastructure and transport sectors are now ripe for disruption, but are they prepared for it?

What are the specific pain points in their digitalisation journey and how can they respond to thrive in this new era to build safe, efficient, liveable and sustainable communities?

Guest of Honour

Dr Janil Puthucheary

Minister-in-Charge, GovTech, Prime Minister’s Office; Second Minister-in-Charge, Smart Nation Initiative; Senior Minister of State, Ministry of Transport & Ministry of Communications and Information

Judges and speakers

Zhang Lei

Founder and CEO, Envision Group

Hosts and moderators

Ko Kheng Hwa

Chairman, Envision Digital International Pte Ltd (Singapore)

Jessica Cheam

Managing Editor, Eco-Business

Agenda

9:00 am

Welcome address

Five groups discuss challenges, ideas and opportunities in Buildings, Energy, Water, Waste and Food. Five facilitators will then return to the final plenary to share and exchange ideas.​

RT1: Buildings  

More homes, commercial and industrial facilities need to be built amid resource constraints, rising temperatures and sea levels. Can Singapore do it without extracting more virgin resources? What are the most forward-thinking developers and building owners doing to implement circular economy principles in the building sector?

What role can policymakers and the finance industry play in circular infrastructure development?

RT 2: Energy 

What does circularity in the energy sector mean for Singapore, which relies on natural gas for 95 per cent of its electricity needs? How can industry become more energy efficient? To what extent can Singapore's energy be supplied by solar and other renewables? Where are the biggest business opportunities?

RT 3: Water 

Singapore prides itself on the ability to close its water loop, even as the world lurches towards a water crisis. What are the opportunities that companies here can exploit in the region?  How can industry become more water efficient? What are the technologies will drive greater efficiency in desalination?  What is the next frontier?

RT 4: Waste 

Waste represents a huge untapped resource inSingapore and in many Asian countries, which have started pushing back against being a dumping ground for developed nations’ trash. What is the economic potential of tapping into these waste streams? What can Singapore do about the fact that more than 80 per cent of its plastic, textile and e-waste end up in the incinerator and landfill? What are the policies required to enable circular resource management?

RT 5: Food 

Singapore wasted  763,100 tonnes of food in 2018, recycling only 17 per cent of it.  How can food waste be reduced at each step of the supply chain? Cities must shore up their food security amid  changing weather patterns and supply disruptions. What are the circular  opportunities that Singapore's fledgling high-tech farming sector can  exploit? 

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Jessica Cheam

Managing Editor, Eco-Business

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8:30 am

Registration and breakfast

Five groups discuss challenges, ideas and opportunities in Buildings, Energy, Water, Waste and Food. Five facilitators will then return to the final plenary to share and exchange ideas.​

RT1: Buildings  

More homes, commercial and industrial facilities need to be built amid resource constraints, rising temperatures and sea levels. Can Singapore do it without extracting more virgin resources? What are the most forward-thinking developers and building owners doing to implement circular economy principles in the building sector?

What role can policymakers and the finance industry play in circular infrastructure development?

RT 2: Energy 

What does circularity in the energy sector mean for Singapore, which relies on natural gas for 95 per cent of its electricity needs? How can industry become more energy efficient? To what extent can Singapore's energy be supplied by solar and other renewables? Where are the biggest business opportunities?

RT 3: Water 

Singapore prides itself on the ability to close its water loop, even as the world lurches towards a water crisis. What are the opportunities that companies here can exploit in the region?  How can industry become more water efficient? What are the technologies will drive greater efficiency in desalination?  What is the next frontier?

RT 4: Waste 

Waste represents a huge untapped resource inSingapore and in many Asian countries, which have started pushing back against being a dumping ground for developed nations’ trash. What is the economic potential of tapping into these waste streams? What can Singapore do about the fact that more than 80 per cent of its plastic, textile and e-waste end up in the incinerator and landfill? What are the policies required to enable circular resource management?

RT 5: Food 

Singapore wasted  763,100 tonnes of food in 2018, recycling only 17 per cent of it.  How can food waste be reduced at each step of the supply chain? Cities must shore up their food security amid  changing weather patterns and supply disruptions. What are the circular  opportunities that Singapore's fledgling high-tech farming sector can  exploit? 

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9:05 am

Keynote address

Five groups discuss challenges, ideas and opportunities in Buildings, Energy, Water, Waste and Food. Five facilitators will then return to the final plenary to share and exchange ideas.​

RT1: Buildings  

More homes, commercial and industrial facilities need to be built amid resource constraints, rising temperatures and sea levels. Can Singapore do it without extracting more virgin resources? What are the most forward-thinking developers and building owners doing to implement circular economy principles in the building sector?

What role can policymakers and the finance industry play in circular infrastructure development?

RT 2: Energy 

What does circularity in the energy sector mean for Singapore, which relies on natural gas for 95 per cent of its electricity needs? How can industry become more energy efficient? To what extent can Singapore's energy be supplied by solar and other renewables? Where are the biggest business opportunities?

RT 3: Water 

Singapore prides itself on the ability to close its water loop, even as the world lurches towards a water crisis. What are the opportunities that companies here can exploit in the region?  How can industry become more water efficient? What are the technologies will drive greater efficiency in desalination?  What is the next frontier?

RT 4: Waste 

Waste represents a huge untapped resource inSingapore and in many Asian countries, which have started pushing back against being a dumping ground for developed nations’ trash. What is the economic potential of tapping into these waste streams? What can Singapore do about the fact that more than 80 per cent of its plastic, textile and e-waste end up in the incinerator and landfill? What are the policies required to enable circular resource management?

RT 5: Food 

Singapore wasted  763,100 tonnes of food in 2018, recycling only 17 per cent of it.  How can food waste be reduced at each step of the supply chain? Cities must shore up their food security amid  changing weather patterns and supply disruptions. What are the circular  opportunities that Singapore's fledgling high-tech farming sector can  exploit? 

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Zhang Lei

Founder and CEO, Envision Group

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9:15 am

Session 1 - In conversation with special guest Dr Janil Puthucheary, Minister-in-Charge, GovTech

In this intimate, high-level discussion, C-suite leaders from real estate, infrastructure and transport sectors will have a dialogue on public-private partnerships as Singapore continues its Smart Nation journey and digital transformation. How can developers, utilities and mobility providers work with regulatory bodies to reap the opportunities of digitalisation to achieve competitive advantage and grow sustainably?

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Dr Janil Puthucheary

Minister-in-Charge, GovTech, Prime Minister’s Office

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Jessica Cheam

Managing Editor, Eco-Business

10:10 am

Networking coffee break

Five groups discuss challenges, ideas and opportunities in Buildings, Energy, Water, Waste and Food. Five facilitators will then return to the final plenary to share and exchange ideas.​

RT1: Buildings  

More homes, commercial and industrial facilities need to be built amid resource constraints, rising temperatures and sea levels. Can Singapore do it without extracting more virgin resources? What are the most forward-thinking developers and building owners doing to implement circular economy principles in the building sector?

What role can policymakers and the finance industry play in circular infrastructure development?

RT 2: Energy 

What does circularity in the energy sector mean for Singapore, which relies on natural gas for 95 per cent of its electricity needs? How can industry become more energy efficient? To what extent can Singapore's energy be supplied by solar and other renewables? Where are the biggest business opportunities?

RT 3: Water 

Singapore prides itself on the ability to close its water loop, even as the world lurches towards a water crisis. What are the opportunities that companies here can exploit in the region?  How can industry become more water efficient? What are the technologies will drive greater efficiency in desalination?  What is the next frontier?

RT 4: Waste 

Waste represents a huge untapped resource inSingapore and in many Asian countries, which have started pushing back against being a dumping ground for developed nations’ trash. What is the economic potential of tapping into these waste streams? What can Singapore do about the fact that more than 80 per cent of its plastic, textile and e-waste end up in the incinerator and landfill? What are the policies required to enable circular resource management?

RT 5: Food 

Singapore wasted  763,100 tonnes of food in 2018, recycling only 17 per cent of it.  How can food waste be reduced at each step of the supply chain? Cities must shore up their food security amid  changing weather patterns and supply disruptions. What are the circular  opportunities that Singapore's fledgling high-tech farming sector can  exploit? 

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10:30 am

Session 2

In the second part of the CEO Roundtable: Digital disruption in the city, Envision CEO Zhang Lei will deep dive into how the latest technological trends such as AIoT are shaping cities. Each business leader is invited to share briefly his/her organisation’s experience in digitalisation, the pain points in implementing smart solutions, and discuss potential partnerships and success stories.

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Ko Kheng Hwa

Chairman, Envision Digital International Pte Ltd (Singapore)

11:30 am

Final thoughts & concluding remarks

Five groups discuss challenges, ideas and opportunities in Buildings, Energy, Water, Waste and Food. Five facilitators will then return to the final plenary to share and exchange ideas.​

RT1: Buildings  

More homes, commercial and industrial facilities need to be built amid resource constraints, rising temperatures and sea levels. Can Singapore do it without extracting more virgin resources? What are the most forward-thinking developers and building owners doing to implement circular economy principles in the building sector?

What role can policymakers and the finance industry play in circular infrastructure development?

RT 2: Energy 

What does circularity in the energy sector mean for Singapore, which relies on natural gas for 95 per cent of its electricity needs? How can industry become more energy efficient? To what extent can Singapore's energy be supplied by solar and other renewables? Where are the biggest business opportunities?

RT 3: Water 

Singapore prides itself on the ability to close its water loop, even as the world lurches towards a water crisis. What are the opportunities that companies here can exploit in the region?  How can industry become more water efficient? What are the technologies will drive greater efficiency in desalination?  What is the next frontier?

RT 4: Waste 

Waste represents a huge untapped resource inSingapore and in many Asian countries, which have started pushing back against being a dumping ground for developed nations’ trash. What is the economic potential of tapping into these waste streams? What can Singapore do about the fact that more than 80 per cent of its plastic, textile and e-waste end up in the incinerator and landfill? What are the policies required to enable circular resource management?

RT 5: Food 

Singapore wasted  763,100 tonnes of food in 2018, recycling only 17 per cent of it.  How can food waste be reduced at each step of the supply chain? Cities must shore up their food security amid  changing weather patterns and supply disruptions. What are the circular  opportunities that Singapore's fledgling high-tech farming sector can  exploit? 

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12:00 pm

CEO Networking lunch and wine-pairing

Five groups discuss challenges, ideas and opportunities in Buildings, Energy, Water, Waste and Food. Five facilitators will then return to the final plenary to share and exchange ideas.​

RT1: Buildings  

More homes, commercial and industrial facilities need to be built amid resource constraints, rising temperatures and sea levels. Can Singapore do it without extracting more virgin resources? What are the most forward-thinking developers and building owners doing to implement circular economy principles in the building sector?

What role can policymakers and the finance industry play in circular infrastructure development?

RT 2: Energy 

What does circularity in the energy sector mean for Singapore, which relies on natural gas for 95 per cent of its electricity needs? How can industry become more energy efficient? To what extent can Singapore's energy be supplied by solar and other renewables? Where are the biggest business opportunities?

RT 3: Water 

Singapore prides itself on the ability to close its water loop, even as the world lurches towards a water crisis. What are the opportunities that companies here can exploit in the region?  How can industry become more water efficient? What are the technologies will drive greater efficiency in desalination?  What is the next frontier?

RT 4: Waste 

Waste represents a huge untapped resource inSingapore and in many Asian countries, which have started pushing back against being a dumping ground for developed nations’ trash. What is the economic potential of tapping into these waste streams? What can Singapore do about the fact that more than 80 per cent of its plastic, textile and e-waste end up in the incinerator and landfill? What are the policies required to enable circular resource management?

RT 5: Food 

Singapore wasted  763,100 tonnes of food in 2018, recycling only 17 per cent of it.  How can food waste be reduced at each step of the supply chain? Cities must shore up their food security amid  changing weather patterns and supply disruptions. What are the circular  opportunities that Singapore's fledgling high-tech farming sector can  exploit? 

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1:30 pm

End of programme

Five groups discuss challenges, ideas and opportunities in Buildings, Energy, Water, Waste and Food. Five facilitators will then return to the final plenary to share and exchange ideas.​

RT1: Buildings  

More homes, commercial and industrial facilities need to be built amid resource constraints, rising temperatures and sea levels. Can Singapore do it without extracting more virgin resources? What are the most forward-thinking developers and building owners doing to implement circular economy principles in the building sector?

What role can policymakers and the finance industry play in circular infrastructure development?

RT 2: Energy 

What does circularity in the energy sector mean for Singapore, which relies on natural gas for 95 per cent of its electricity needs? How can industry become more energy efficient? To what extent can Singapore's energy be supplied by solar and other renewables? Where are the biggest business opportunities?

RT 3: Water 

Singapore prides itself on the ability to close its water loop, even as the world lurches towards a water crisis. What are the opportunities that companies here can exploit in the region?  How can industry become more water efficient? What are the technologies will drive greater efficiency in desalination?  What is the next frontier?

RT 4: Waste 

Waste represents a huge untapped resource inSingapore and in many Asian countries, which have started pushing back against being a dumping ground for developed nations’ trash. What is the economic potential of tapping into these waste streams? What can Singapore do about the fact that more than 80 per cent of its plastic, textile and e-waste end up in the incinerator and landfill? What are the policies required to enable circular resource management?

RT 5: Food 

Singapore wasted  763,100 tonnes of food in 2018, recycling only 17 per cent of it.  How can food waste be reduced at each step of the supply chain? Cities must shore up their food security amid  changing weather patterns and supply disruptions. What are the circular  opportunities that Singapore's fledgling high-tech farming sector can  exploit? 

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